Castle Brands eyes Bourbon growth with Copperhead Distillery Co stake

castle-brands
New York-based spirits firm Castle Brands is to build new a warehouse in Kentucky after buying a stake in a Bourbon distillery owner. Castle Brands today said it had purchased about 20% of Copperhead Distillery Co, which owns Bourbon maker Kentucky Artisan Distillery. The investment will be used to build a warehouse and tasting facility at the distillery for Castle’s Bourbon brand, Jefferson’s, as well as provide “distilling capabilities”, the company said without giving details. Full story

Advertisements

Jefferson’s Bourbon partners with KY Artisan Distillery to open a visitor’s center in Crestwood

kyartdiss
There are the big guns scattered around the state — Woodford, Four Roses, Maker’s Mark, Buffalo Trace, Wild Turkey, to name a few. And then there are the smaller operations, who may not have rows of rick houses but who still carve out a niche in the overflowing bourbon market. One such bourbon is Jefferson’s, and soon it’ll add its name to the Kentucky Bourbon Trail Craft Tour. Full story

Rye is rising: A new whiskey trend that goes with the grain

ryes
Fans of brown spirits are taking a rye approach to imbibing. Hot on the heels of the bourbon boom, more ryes are appearing on shelves as consumers explore whiskey’s spicier, fruitier side. “People are rediscovering rye whisky and its unique flavor,” says Dan Tullio, master ambassador for Canadian whisky for Beam Suntory, which just launched its Alberta Rye Dark Batch Whisky. Full story

Chef Edward Lee Goes from Brooklyn Kitchens to Kentucky Bourbon

edward-lee-trey-bourbon
Chef Edward Lee describes himself as “one part Southern soul, one part Asian spice, and one part New York attitude,” and his recipes pull from all parts of his background. Raised in Brooklyn and trained in New York, former Top Chef contestant Lee has now spent 10 years in Louisville, Kentucky, building his critically-acclaimed restaurant — 610 Magnolia, its sister speakeasy – MilkWood, and writing about his journeys and recipes along the way (his book, Smoke and Pickles: Recipes and Stories from a New Southern Kitchen, was published last year.) The multiple James Beard Award nominee is now branching out from the kitchen and into the distillery, blending the unique flavors that inspire his food into his own line of whiskey. In this guest essay, he shares how that project first began, not surprisingly, after a few drinks. Full story